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Family Money Health Work Play Shop Expert Advice
Home >Behind the Movers: Andy Grove
Jack
Welch
Mark
Leslie
Steve
Case
Andy
Grove
Anita
Roddick

MOVER: Andy Grove
AGE: 64
JOB: Chairman and co-founder of Intel; Stanford University lecturer
FAMILY
:
Wife, Eva; two daughters
EDUCATION
:
City College of New York, B.S., chemical engineering, 1960; University of California, Berkeley, Ph.D., 1963


DISTINCTION
: This former refugee from the Nazis went on to become one of the most influential people in the development of microchips. Called a "digital revolutionary" by Time magazine, which named him "Man of the Year" in 1997, Grove and his co-founders have built Intel into a $115 billion company that makes about 90 percent of the PC microprocessors on the planet.

Q
: Why do you like to teach?

A
: I think it is an enjoyable process for two reasons. First is, nothing clarifies your own thoughts as much as the need to explain them to a varied group of people with different starting points and different frames of mind. So, I like the process of having to understand something well enough so I can teach. Secondly, I like the process that when you succeed with that and your audience gets it, it's a very satisfactory conclusion to the first part. You have succeeded in explaining it because they are getting it.

Q
: There's a connection?

A
: There's a connection, that's right. And that's the difference between teaching and writing. Because when you write you would still [have to clarify your thoughts], but you don't get the feedback. The feedback that you get reviews or comments is so far removed from the act of elucidation, articulation that there is no immediacy to it. When you teach a live class, that feedback comes almost at the second that it happens.


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